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Teaching About Nonfiction

Nonfiction-Elements-Cover-W   We often assume young readers know the differences between fiction and nonfiction and if they can comprehend one, they can automatically understand the other. However research has shown that proficient readers use different strategies for informational texts and that these strategies must be explicitly modeled and practiced.

Nonfiction comes in a variety of formats including maps, signs, letters,  recipes, advertisements, diagrams, instructions, textbooks, and certain websites. In addition, readers need to know how to use an index, glossary, and the importance of captions.

So, I created this resource to go along with my nonfiction elements lessons. Inside are 14 different text features commonly found in informational texts.

 

 

NF Diagrams page

There is one page devoted to each feature. There is a description below, and a place to add an example. There are 3 ways your students could complete this. 1) is to look through magazines such as National Geographic for Kids or Weekly Readers for the feature, cut it out, and glue to the proper page. 2) is to draw their own example. 3) is to use the examples provided in this unit.

 

Nonfiction-Elements-sample-Nonfiction Elementsexamples

It is a great tool to help anchor each lesson as well as a handy reference guide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lessons correspond to Common Core Standards for RI.2.5, RI.2.7, RI.3.5, and RI.3.7.

 

If you think this would be helpful with your students too CLICK HERE.

Alison Monk

When I started teaching, I quickly realized that student teaching didn't prepare me for the real challenges of being alone in a classroom full of young children. The learning curve was steep and time was limited. That is why I created the Literacy Garden. My hope is this will be a place for inspiration, mentoring, and connecting.

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Hi! I'm Alison

My #1 passion is all things literacy! I'm a curriculum creator and literacy specialist who loves to share creative and engaging ways to grow your students and are easy to implement. You can expect to find teaching tips to boost your confidence and grow your learners. You don't have to do this alone! I'm the support you've been looking for. I'm so glad you are here!

About the Literacy Garden

When I started teaching, I quickly realized that student teaching didn't prepare me for the real challenges of being alone in a classroom full of young children. The learning curve was steep and time was limited. That is why I created the Literacy Garden. My hope is this will be a place for inspiration, mentoring, and connecting.

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